As recommended on TripAdvisor

thin

Frequently Asked Questions

When is the best time to take a Safari in Tanzania?

The best wildlife viewing months in Tanzania are during the Dry season from late June to October. The best chance of seeing the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti is during June and July and the time to see the wildebeest calving is late January to February.

The southern and western circuit parks are best visited during the Dry season (June to October), unlike the more popular northern circuit parks that can be visited year-round. Tarangire is the only exception since its wildlife viewing is considerably better in the Dry season as well.

June to October

Dry Season

June and July are the best months to see the wildebeest migration

Animals are easier to spot since they concentrate around waterholes and rivers and there is less vegetation

There are fewer mosquitoes because there is little to no rain; skies are clear and most days are sunny

Even though most tourists visit during the Dry season, the parks still don’t feel crowded, except for the Seronera area in the Serengeti and the Ngorongoro Crater

November to May

Low Season

Late January to February is the time to see the calving in the southern Serengeti, and an excellent time to see predator action

The scenery is green and beautiful; it’s low season, meaning lower rates and less crowded parks.

Although wildlife is easier to spot in the Dry season, you’ll still see plenty and most northern circuit parks offer good year-round wildlife viewing.

Migratory birds are present, and bird watching is at its best Except for March, April and May, rains are mostly short afternoon showers if that and seldom have a negative impact on your trip.

What do I wear on safari?

The best way to get close to the wildlife is to blend in with your surroundings as much as possible by going neutral. Wear greens, browns, and khakis so as to not attract unnecessary attention. For South Africa, khaki is the recommended colour.

Light-weight, breathable fabrics minimize noise when walking. Layers are a great way to pack light but stay warm. Temperatures can be cool on morning game drives, hot in the afternoon and cold at night. Layers allow you to remove clothing to make yourself comfortable as temperatures fluctuate.

Airy, long-sleeved shirts with a collar will keep the sun off your arms and neck.

Combat trousers are perfect with plenty of pockets to store your camera, sunscreen, and binoculars.

A light jacket or fleece is great for an extra layer of warmth in case you need it. Fleece is great because it dries quickly too.

Comfortable trainers are suitable for most safaris, even walking safaris. You can expect to be climbing in and out of the safari vehicle frequently and some light walking around the bush.

Hats are a fantastic way to protect your head and face from the sun in an open-top safari vehicle and they have the added benefit of reducing glare for better game viewing.

Sunglasses should be worn to block out harmful rays and polarized glasses will cut through the glare to make sure you don’t miss a thing.

Don’t forget to bring a swimsuit if your lodge has a pool.

For your evening meal, light colors are recommended so as to not attract mosquitoes. Linen trousers are the perfect way to look smart, stay cool, and prevent mosquito bites.

What NOT to Wear on Safari

Don’t bring bright-colored clothing or busy patterns. This will draw attention to you and scare off the wildlife.

Avoid camouflage clothing as some African countries reserve this pattern for military personnel only.

White colored clothing will quickly show dirt and dust, so try to go neutral instead.

Formal wear is not necessary as most lodges and camps have a relaxed dress code. Bring a smart, clean outfit to wear to dinner, but there is no need to go too formal.

Heavy hiking boots take up too much room in your suitcase and aren’t necessary for most safaris unless you have been told that your itinerary includes walking through the rainforest or harsh terrain.

Too much clothing! Pack light – most safari lodges offer laundry facilities. You can also save space with convertible clothing like zip off trousers that turn into shorts or a zip off fleece that turns into a gilet.

Will there be wildlife roaming freely within the parks and lodges?

It is important to never assume that any of the animals encountered on your game drive are tame. Though attacks by wild animals are unusual, nothing in the African wilderness is predictable. While you are staying in your safari lodges and camps, it is important to be especially cautious and aware of your surroundings as many of these areas are not fenced and contain wildlife roaming freely.

If you have children with you, keep them in sight and do not let them wander alone. At smaller tented lodges, you will always be escorted to and from your tent for dinner or during the night. Should you have any concerns, please do not hesitate to raise them to the staff or your guide.

What about tipping when on safari?

Our tipping guideline is 20-30 USD per guest per day to the driver guide, though it is ultimately up to the clients’ discretion to decide what amount they are happy to give. It depends on the clients’ overall satisfaction with their driver guide & their safari experience.

When you have a personal cook for mobile camping, the tipping guideline is between 5 to 10 USD per person per day, which is also up to the client’s discretion.

The recommended currency for tipping is in USD cash, and it is customary for the clients to tip at the end of their safari.

What about bathrooms in the bush?

Throughout your safari, there are various areas with public bathroom facilities such as ranger stations, museums, visitor centers, camps, lodges and picnic sites. Since you will be on a private safari, there will be plenty of opportunities where no other vehicles are in sight. At any time, your driver-guide can find a safe and private area where you may simply exit to the rear of the vehicle. Two large spare tires at the back of the vehicle, blocking the view from anyone else within the vehicle.

What documents do I need to travel to Tanzania?

You will require a passport valid for at least six months after your date of entry.

Citizens of the UK, the US, Canada, Australia, and most countries in the EU, need a tourist visa to enter Tanzania. Application details and forms can be found on Tanzanian Embassy websites, however, in many cases, these can simply be bought at the airport upon arrival in Tanzania.

As with all visa matters — contact your local Tanzanian Embassy for the latest information.

Typical food in Tanzania

The food served in the safari camps/lodges varies, but is tasty and delicious. Gourmet cooks bake fresh bread, and produce soups, salads, and entrees that could easily grace tables at the top restaurants around the world. Meals are international in flavour with soups, salads, cold meats, pasta dishes, meat and fish dishes, and breads. Your day normally starts with tea and biscuits before your morning activity.

Returning to your lodge or camp late morning, brunch is enjoyed – cereals, fruit, bacon, eggs, sausage, and toast. Buffet lunches are typical with a warm dish such as stew served with salads, quiches and cold meats. Dinner consists of an appetizer followed by meat, fish and pasta dishes served with assorted vegetables and sauces. Dinner is followed by coffee/ tea, cheeses, and stunning desserts.

In Tanzania’s towns and villages, the food is usually simpler. Plain grilled meat, nyama choma, is very popular, and often served with sauce, rice, chips, or ugali (cornmeal). Indian cuisine is also wide spread. The locally brewed beer is good, including Serengeti, Safari, Kilimanjaro, mbege (homebrew from the Chagga people) and banana beer; imported beers (e.g. Tusker from Kenya) and wine are also excellent.

What is the time difference in Tanzania?

Tanzania is three hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT+3). Tanzania does not operate daylight saving time, hence there’s no time difference between their summer and winter months.

What is the currency in Tanzania?

The official unit of currency is the Tanzanian shilling (TZS), divided into 100 cents. Notes are issued as TSh10,000; 5000; 1000; 500; 200 and 100. Coins are issued as TSh100; 50; 20; 10, 5 and 1.

The tourism industry prices everything in US Dollars and they are the preferred unit of currency. Major currencies can be exchanged in the larger towns. Foreign exchange bureaux in the main towns usually offer a better rate on traveller’s cheques than do the banks. ATMs are available in major cities only. Major lodges, some hotels and travel agents in urban areas accept credit cards, but these should not be relied on and can incur a 10% surcharge.See www.oando.com for the latest exchange rates.

Is it safe to travel to Tanzania?

Tanzania is a safe country to travel in, Tanzanians are warm-hearted and generous people and are eager to help and assist visitors. As in all countries, a little common sense goes a long way and reasonable precautions should still be taken, such as locking valuables in the hotel safe, do not carry a lot of camera equipment especially in the major cities, do not wear too much jewellery, do not carry large amounts of cash on your person etc.

Guides will monitor your safety in cities and in the game areas. From time to time generalized travel statements are issued concerning travel conditions in the area. For current Department of State announcements and Consular information see http://travel.state.gov/.

Awarded Best African Safari Company

2022

Awarded Best African Safari Company 2022 by Lux Life in the 2022 Travel & Tourism Awards.

Winners of the 2022 Customer Service Excellence Award

Tripadvisor Travelers Choice Winners 2022.

Don't just take our word for it

  • star rating  Outstanding the whole way through. Seamless organisation and planning - quick responses to all of our questions and so much flexibility in planing our itinerary.

    The Luna Team... read more

    H351PPsuep
    31st October 2022
  • star rating  If you're looking for a safari and beach holiday in Tanzania and Zanzibar then I urge you to use Luna Safari. It was a pleasure to work with Michaela; simple,... read more

    K6717EFluisaf
    25th September 2022
  • star rating  The Safari in Tanzania was definitely the highlight of my trip. With my lovely friend Luisa, we set off on our 3 day adventure to the Serengeti and Ngorongoro... read more

    F4504DKchiarac
    22nd September 2022
  • star rating  I'm so happy we went with Luna Safari! Everything was truly exceptional from the minute we landed to our arrival to Zanzibar. I went with my husband, and... read more

    S74YBanas
    16th September 2022
  • star rating  We are on the last day of our Tanzania vacation and it was been a true joy. I was pretty overwhelmed at first when looking for Safari company’s because there... read more

    Mary Darby C
    1st September 2022
  • star rating  My family just finished an incredible life experience on this safari. Everything about this safari was exceptional!! The personal touch, attention to detail, and hands on management of Luna... read more

    304darbyc
    29th August 2022
  • star rating  I have just got back from a mother daughter safari trip that the wonderful Luna safari organised for us. Michaela, Alfani and the gorgeous Arlo made us very welcome... read more

    SarahT391
    13th August 2022
  • star rating  I have just returned from an amazing safari and Zanzibar trip with Luna Safari. From my first contact back in 2019 right through to my return home Michaela has always... read more

    Kerry T
    13th August 2022
  • star rating  We have just returned from the most amazing Safari/Zanzibar experience. Zanzibar we arranged independently, however if we hadn't I am sure that Luna would have made it just as... read more

    Emma S
    8th August 2022
  • star rating  Ive been dreaming of africa since childhood, planned it in 2019. and finally did it “ en famille” last month( thx , covid 🙁
    After asking several outfits for... read more

    Karen O
    2nd August 2022

With open arms we welcome you in to the wild……